#LOVE_YOUR_BONES

#LOVE_YOUR_BONES

Break a leg” is an idiom that we use to wish someone “good luck” in an ironic way. This was first used in the world of entertainment, where well-wishers would typically say “Break a leg” to actors and musicians before they would go on stage to perform.

The expression reflects a theatrical superstition whereby wishing a person “good luck” was actually considered bad luck. The expression is now not limited to actors and musicians, as superstitions and customs travel through other professions and then into common use. Just a little bit of trivia before we get stuck into something more serious….

Osteoporosis:

[OST] + [EE] + [OH] + [PUH] + [ROH] + [SIS]

Meaning: “porous bone.”

Osteoporosis is a disease in which the density and quality of bones are reduced; this leads a weakening of the skeleton and increased risk of fracture, specifically in the spine, wrists, hip, pelvis and upper arms. In many affected people, bone loss is gradual and without warning signs until the disease is advanced.

For this reason Osteoporosis is also known as “the silent crippler” because a person usually doesn’t know that they have it until it’s too late. Unfortunately, in far too many cases the first real “symptom” is a broken bone. Other physical signs of osteoporosis are loss of height with gradual curvature of the back (caused by vertebral compression fractures).

Osteoporosis risk factors:


Older Woman’s disease?

There are many misconceptions about osteoporosis, for example that it is a disease that affects Woman only when they are older.  In fact, bone loss in women can begin as early as the age of 25, and worldwide, the lifetime risk for a woman to have an osteoporotic fracture is 30 – 40%. In addition to this, new studies have shown the prevalence of osteoporosis in men is higher than previously thought with approximately one in five men affected.  This is clearly not just a disease that affects older woman.

Treatment

Rapid progress is being made in the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. Early detection of bone loss is key to the prevention of suffering and escalation of health care costs. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements are effective in assessing fracture risk, confirming a diagnosis of osteoporosis and monitoring the effect of treatment. Don’t delay, #Loveyourbones and assess your risk today.

Source: International Osteoporosis Foundation.

Risk Assessment:

Early interventions are the best way to manage to Osteoporosis, click on the link below to assess your risk.

Assess your risk here

Osteoporosis and Exercise:

One of the best ways to strengthen your bones and prevent osteoporosis is through regular exercise.  Many health experts recommend exercise for osteoporosis, because when you exercise you don’t just build muscle and endurance, you also build and maintain the amount and thickness of your bones (also known as bone mass and density).  Even if you already have osteoporosis, exercising can help maintain the bone mass you have, and lower the rate of bone loss, lowering the risk of fracture.  In addition, exercise helps reduce the risk of falling, which is a vital skill for anyone at risk.

Silver Fit recommended three types of exercise for building healthy bones.

  • Weight-bearing (meaning your feet and legs support your body’s weight; e.g.: walking, dancing, or step exercise)
  • Resistance (strength exercises)
  • Flexibility (stretch exercises)

For more information on Osteoporosis, or to find a health care practitioner close to you who can assess your specific needs, please contact NOFSA (National Osteoporosis Foundation of South Africa)

info@osteoporosis.org.za
Helpline: 086 110 2265
Telephone: 021 976 4995
WhatsApp:  067 902 6150

https://osteoporosis.org.za/contact-us/

Start an Exercise Programme Today!

I HEART YOU

I HEART YOU

Your heart, which started as a tiny spec when you were just a fertilized embryo, beat months before you were even born.  This heartbeat was the very first sign that you were alive and since then this same heartbeat has become the governor of your life.

Your heart beats snuggly in a well-designed safe space within your rib cage, between your lungs.  The average adult heart is the size of 2 fists clasped together.  Hollow, and vaguely cone-shaped, it weighs about 250-350 grams, a pretty modest size considering it is your body’s greatest workhorse.  Powering the entire circulatory system, it transports nutrients, oxygen, waste, heat, hormones and immune cells throughout the body over and over. Lub Dub, Lub Dub.

Night and day, it beats consistently. 100 000 beats per day, 35 million beats per year, 2-3 billion beats in a lifetime. Your loyal friend.

To put it simply, your heart is just a pump, and its main concern is to maintain the pressure gradient in the circulatory system.  It does this by generating high hydrostatic pressure to pump blood out of your heart, while also creating low pressure to bring blood back into your heart.  This pressure gradient is essentially what we mean when we talk about blood pressure. Blood pressure is a measure of the amount of strain your arteries feel as your heart moves your 5 litres of blood around your body. For blood pressure to be considered normal, the systolic pressure (the peak pressure on the contracting ventricles) should be less than 140mmHg.  Conversely, diastolic pressure (the pressure in your arteries when the ventricles are relaxed) should be less than 90mmHg.

The easiest way to break a heart is to mess with its pressure. 1 in 2 South Africans suffer from hypertension and these figures are on the rise.  Not a very nice way to treat your loyal friend, is it?  Often there are no symptoms until it’s too late, so it’s best to keep your finger on the pulse, and check your blood pressure regularly.

How Your Heart Does Its Job

Your heart, and its vessels, is a relatively simple yet elegant set-up that requires precise coordination to create the high and low pressures required to pump blood around the body.  Your heart gets this right by using its own anatomical pacemaker, and some heart cells can generate their own electricity, which controls signal and communication throughout your heart so that each section works together in unison.

Your heart receives deoxygenated blood through the vena cava vein, where it spends a second in the right atrium before dropping into the right ventricle.  From there it is sent quickly to the lungs where your blood it packed full of oxygen and then returns to your heart into the left atrium before sliding down to the left ventricle where it will build up pressure again.  Blood then leaves your heart from the left ventricle through the aorta, the biggest and toughest artery in your body roughly the diameter of a garden hose.  From your heart, your oxygenated blood travels through your circulatory system in order to feed every single solitary cell in your body with the nutrients you need to stay alive.  It takes about a minute for all the blood in your body to complete that circuit which means even if you are at rest your hardworking circulatory system moves about 7500L of blood through your heart every day.

Blood vessels are sometimes described as ‘a glorified plumbing system of the body’, but they are not just passive tubes, made merely to carry liquid around. Blood vessels are actually dynamic organs capable of contracting and expanding as they deliver oxygen and nutrients to cells, carry away waste products and maintain blood pressure.  If all your blood vessels were strung together in a single line they would measure 100 000km! Keeping these blood vessels healthy, unclogged, supple and functioning well can be achieved by having good quality blood pumping through them as opposed to blood dripping with bad cholesterol.

It is safe to say that your heart is probably the most iconic muscle in the body. However, as with all muscles your heart, as well as your entire cardiovascular system, needs exercise to maintain its form and function. Cardiovascular exercise is really just any physical activity that raises your heart rate sufficiently and is an essential component to any exercise program. Cardiovascular exercise greatly reduces the risks of cardiovascular diseases like high blood pressure, high cholesterol, risk of heart attack and stroke. We hope you are getting enough of it.

Stop for a moment, put your finger on your pulse and ask yourself; how much love do you give your very own heart? The workhorses of your body, the most iconic muscle that you own, and the governor of your life. Lub Dub, Lub Dub…

UNDERSTANDING JOINT PAIN

UNDERSTANDING JOINT PAIN

Do you wake up and need to rub your knees or shoulders or back, because your joints are aching? This is joint pain… There is a variety of pain and a variety of reasons why we experience pain. So today, I want to focus on  understanding joint pain, and specifically, why we have MORNING JOINT PAIN

We go to bed… we have a good night of sleep… and yet, we wake feeling like we have been hit by a ton of bricks! You may know that morning stiffness is more common as one gets older… but is it inevitable?

Lets start by looking at some of the causes of morning stiffness:

1. Inactivity – General inactivity leads to muscle weakness and poor flexibility that puts extra strain on our joints.

2. Poor sleep – Interrupted sleep, too much or too little sleep, can affect our joints the next day.

3. Being overweight – Excess weight puts extra strain on our joints as well as causing us to feel lethargic.

4. A cold or damp environment – If we are sleeping in an area that is cold of damp, that will cause us to be tense during sleep and the cold will stiffen the joints.

5. Prolonged stillness – when we sleep we are still, therefore the fluid in our joints moves to where gravity tells it and our joints aren’t lubricated evenly when we start moving in the morning.

6. Arthritis or other chronic conditions – Joint stiffness is often worst following periods of inactivity. So in the morning our joints have stiffened up and you may experience pain.

So now that we know some of the things that cause us to be stiff… how do we counterbalance this and relax our stiff muscles???

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