#LOVE_YOUR_BONES

#LOVE_YOUR_BONES

Break a leg” is an idiom that we use to wish someone “good luck” in an ironic way. This was first used in the world of entertainment, where well-wishers would typically say “Break a leg” to actors and musicians before they would go on stage to perform.

The expression reflects a theatrical superstition whereby wishing a person “good luck” was actually considered bad luck. The expression is now not limited to actors and musicians, as superstitions and customs travel through other professions and then into common use. Just a little bit of trivia before we get stuck into something more serious….

Osteoporosis:

[OST] + [EE] + [OH] + [PUH] + [ROH] + [SIS]

Meaning: “porous bone.”

Osteoporosis is a disease in which the density and quality of bones are reduced; this leads a weakening of the skeleton and increased risk of fracture, specifically in the spine, wrists, hip, pelvis and upper arms. In many affected people, bone loss is gradual and without warning signs until the disease is advanced.

For this reason Osteoporosis is also known as “the silent crippler” because a person usually doesn’t know that they have it until it’s too late. Unfortunately, in far too many cases the first real “symptom” is a broken bone. Other physical signs of osteoporosis are loss of height with gradual curvature of the back (caused by vertebral compression fractures).

Osteoporosis risk factors:


Older Woman’s disease?

There are many misconceptions about osteoporosis, for example that it is a disease that affects Woman only when they are older.  In fact, bone loss in women can begin as early as the age of 25, and worldwide, the lifetime risk for a woman to have an osteoporotic fracture is 30 – 40%. In addition to this, new studies have shown the prevalence of osteoporosis in men is higher than previously thought with approximately one in five men affected.  This is clearly not just a disease that affects older woman.

Treatment

Rapid progress is being made in the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. Early detection of bone loss is key to the prevention of suffering and escalation of health care costs. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements are effective in assessing fracture risk, confirming a diagnosis of osteoporosis and monitoring the effect of treatment. Don’t delay, #Loveyourbones and assess your risk today.

Source: International Osteoporosis Foundation.

Risk Assessment:

Early interventions are the best way to manage to Osteoporosis, click on the link below to assess your risk.

Assess your risk here

Osteoporosis and Exercise:

One of the best ways to strengthen your bones and prevent osteoporosis is through regular exercise.  Many health experts recommend exercise for osteoporosis, because when you exercise you don’t just build muscle and endurance, you also build and maintain the amount and thickness of your bones (also known as bone mass and density).  Even if you already have osteoporosis, exercising can help maintain the bone mass you have, and lower the rate of bone loss, lowering the risk of fracture.  In addition, exercise helps reduce the risk of falling, which is a vital skill for anyone at risk.

Silver Fit recommended three types of exercise for building healthy bones.

  • Weight-bearing (meaning your feet and legs support your body’s weight; e.g.: walking, dancing, or step exercise)
  • Resistance (strength exercises)
  • Flexibility (stretch exercises)

For more information on Osteoporosis, or to find a health care practitioner close to you who can assess your specific needs, please contact NOFSA (National Osteoporosis Foundation of South Africa)

info@osteoporosis.org.za
Helpline: 086 110 2265
Telephone: 021 976 4995
WhatsApp:  067 902 6150

https://osteoporosis.org.za/contact-us/

Start an Exercise Programme Today!

WOMEN’S MONTH

WOMEN’S MONTH

August – the month when women unite to celebrate their uniqueness and embrace the power that comes with being female. Women are special and so it makes sense that the ageing process, as well as the factors that influence ageing are different between the genders. So while there are a lot of similarities, there are some things that are uniquely female.

According to the World Health Organisation, women live an average four years longer than men. Life expectancy ranges from 58 – 80 across the world. However cardiovascular disease, which is often considered a “male” problem, is the number one cause of death in women. Luckily exercise substantially reduces not only the risk of cardiovascular disease but also many other chronic disease risk factors including breast cancer, osteoporosis, diabetes and more. Women tend to live longer than men, as they make up 54% of people 60 years of age, 60% at age 75 and older, and to 70% at age 90 and older. As a result, it is even more important for older women to ensure that they maintain an active lifestyle achieving the correct type and amount of exercise. Being active is not just about adding years to your life, it’s about adding quality life to your years.

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